Control Your Pet’s Arthritis with Adequan

With the winter season underway, your pet will feel the effects of the cold weather. But for older pets, mobility may become an issue as the result of arthritis or joint pain. Thankfully, there are medications and treatments that can help your pet remain pain-free during the winter months, including Adequan.

Adequan is a very safe, FDA-approved, injectable medication used to help improve joint and bone health. For all dogs and cats that have already started to feel the pain due to arthritis, this medication is imperative. The drug is administered with a simple injection. It helps keep the cartilage healthy and intact so that the bone in the joint cannot touch other bones. For cats, this is one of the only safe, long-lasting arthritis medications available.

For those looking for a holistic solution, your pet’s arthritis can also be treated with acupuncture. Acupuncture is defined as the insertion of needles into specific points on the body to cause a desired healing effect. It works great for arthritis by decreasing the inflammation and discomfort your pet may be experiencing. Pets that are limping or having difficulty getting up or running may benefit from these treatments.

In conjunction with Adequan and/or acupuncture treatments, arthritic pets should be kept on supplements. Antioxidants and glucosamine supplements are great to help promote joint health. At times, pain medications and anti-inflammatories may be used.

Any veterinarian at Central Veterinary Associates is able to administer Adequan injections. For those looking to have acupuncture performed on their pet, they should schedule an appointment with Dr. Frank DeFeis, who is trained in veterinary acupuncture. If you would like to start your pet on supplements, anti-inflammatories, Adequan and/or acupuncture prior to the start of the warm-weather season, call Central Veterinary Associates, P.C. to schedule an appointment.

3 comments to Control Your Pet’s Arthritis with Adequan

  • Hey Centralvets,
    Along the same lines,, I have two female pet rats, sisters. One called Tickles, has a very large tumour under her arm that is inoperable but she seems to have a good appetite and is alert and happy…however, her sister Nelly is very sick and has a lump and quite bad arthritis. We have made an appointment next week to put Nelly to sleep but I know that when it’s time to put her down that Tickles won’t cope at all when she leaves, as she got very depressed when we seperated them after Nelly had an operation for another tumour. Tickles wouldn’t eat and would sit in the cage with her eyes closed all day. Should I leave Tickles to keep on living and risk her getting severly depressed or take them both to the vet and put them both to sleep at the same time?
    BTW great blogpost

  • Jen

    I’m using magnetic therapy to treat my arthritis. It is working really good. I wonder if the same treatment is available for animals?

  • Love reading posts with people taking such good care of their pets. Its great to know there are some that care so much.

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