Celebrating National Animal Safety and Protection Month

ducks

From pets to wild creatures, animals play a vital part of our daily lives, such as companionship and sources of nutrition. That’s why it’s important to protect all animals; big or small, feathered, scaled, hoofed, pawed, or otherwise – and to understand the key ways in which to care for them in their time of need. Initially started by the PALS Foundation, an organization aimed at finding the best approach to helping people and animals coexist to provide the most benefits to nature, this nationally recognized dedication promotes the handling and care of both domestic and wild animals to better encourage a happy ecosystem.

When it comes to domesticated animals, one of the most important things you can do is to understand their needs and providing the necessary support. Pet owners, specifically, should implement the following:

  • Provide collars with updated ID tags and micro-chipping your pet to ensure their safe return, should they ever become lost.
  • Keep all poisons, toxins and other dangerous items out of the reach of pets.
  • Purchase pet insurance, which will help with the costs of unexpected injuries or illnesses.
  • Implement an Emergency Preparedness Plan for cases of extreme weather and evacuations.
  • Learn about the best ways to travel safely with your pet.

Those who love animals, but do not currently own a pet, can become involved by fostering pets looking for a permanent home, volunteering at a local animal shelter or donating money or supplies to animal organizations.

Central Veterinary Associates’ hospital in Valley Stream is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For more information or to make an appointment, call (516) 825-3066 or visit www.centralvets.com.

Central Veterinary Associates Say: Don’t Forget Your Pet During National Preparedness Month

Vet examining cat with stethoscope

Vet examining cat with stethoscope

Fifteen years ago, with hurricane season well underway, winter storms right around the corner and the after effects of the terrorist attacks, the Federal Emergency Management Agency declared September as National Preparedness Month. In recognition of this nationwide initiative, Central Veterinary Associates (CVA) is reminding pet owners to remember their pets in their emergency preparedness plans.

As last year’s theme of Don’t Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today was such a large success, FEMA is continuing the focus this year with added attention set on a continuing emphasis of preparedness for children, elderly and people with disabilities or other functional needs. The theme’s overall focus is on floods, wildfires, hurricanes and power outages. For these, and all natural and man-made disasters, Americans are encouraged to create an emergency kit containing enough food, water, medications and other consumables to last up to ten days. This kit can save lives and reduce distress in the event of a natural disaster.

Pet owners should take extra precautions in their emergency planning by locating a safe place to take your pet, such as to a relative, local veterinarian or animal shelter, as some emergency shelters do not allow pets. CVA also urges pets to be microchipped as it will help to locate a pet should they become separated from an owner and a collar falls off. In the event that a disaster occurs without warning, all pet owners should have an animal-friendly emergency kit that includes pet medication and medical records, sturdy leashes and harnesses and/or carriers to transport the animal, food, water, litter box, scoops and garbage bags, the veterinarian’s contact information, current photos of the animal in case they get lost and the pet’s bed or toys (if easily transportable).

“Leaving your pets out of your emergency plan and kit can put pets, pet owners and first responders in danger,” says Dr. John Charos, DVM, President/CEO, Central Veterinary Associates. “Preparation makes a difference, so it is important to have your pet microchipped along with an emergency plan, kit and designated area for your family and pet to stay safe should a disaster occur. CVA offers microchipping services and pet boarding that has a veterinarian make regular rounds to ensure your pet’s comfort and administer medications during their stay.”

CVA keeps its hospital in Valley Stream open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year, even in the event of a natural disaster. For more information or to make an appointment, call 1 (888) 4CVA-PET (428-2738) or visit www.centralvets.com.

Dog-friendly Recreation Areas on Long Island

 

It’s safe to say that pets and their owners both get tired of being cooped up indoors. YOU might have the chance to spend a few hours at a local park, but can your dog come along? The good news is that there are an increasing numbers of Long Island parks and recreation areas that allow dogs. As you make your outdoor plans, here are some of our top picks for pet-friendly outdoor destinations near you.

  1. Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens: Enjoy a stroll (or a jog) through the historic grounds of the 1939 and 1964 World’s Fair with your dog. You’ll enjoy the scenery, he’ll enjoy the exercise. Even better, in certain areas of the park before 9 a.m. or after 9 p.m., you can let him off the leash! Many other parks in Queens provide dog-friendly facilities; check this list for details.
  2. Bay Park, East Rockaway: Although dogs aren’t allowed in county parks in Nassau County, Bay Park on the south shore of Long Island offers a special dog run where your pet can socialize and roam off-leash. A few other county parks in Nassau offer dog runs; check this list for details.
  3. Hempstead State Park, Hempstead: Easily accessible from the Southern State Parkway, this state park includes a dog-friendly area near its South Pond. Keep in mind that dogs have to be on a leash no more than six feet long. A park map is available here.
  4. Coindre Hall, Huntington: This little-known park on Long Island’s North Shore is a popular destination for dog lovers. Dogs and their owners alike can enjoy romping on the spacious lawns adjoining the hall, a former Gold Coast mansion, as well as wandering down to the shore of Huntington Harbor.
  5. Gardiner County Park, Bay Shore: If you have the time for an excursion into Suffolk County, consider visiting this park off Montauk Highway near the Robert Moses Causeway. According to the website BringFido, Gardiner County Park is known for being “extremely dog-friendly,” and it is easy to see why. Amenities include plenty of on-leash trails, waste disposal stations and even a doggie water fountain. If your pet loves swimming, she can even paddle around in the Great South Bay!

These are just a few of the dog-friendly parks Long Island has to offer. You can also check out these lists of pet-friendly destinations in the New York area from CBS and Newsday.

As you enjoy the great outdoors with your dog, always remember to bring plenty of water for both of you, make sure your pet is protected by flea and tick medication and watch for signs of dehydration and heat exhaustion. And as always, never leave your pet alone in a car.

If you have any questions or your pet has any health issues, don’t hesitate to call us at 1 (888) 4CVA-PET (428-2738). Our Valley Stream office is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.

Learning the Signs of Animal Cruelty

 

Puppies kept in bad conditionsA few months ago, a pet groomer in San Mateo, California made headlines when he arrested on suspicion of animal cruelty after a dog died in his care. The dog was bleeding from the mouth and had difficulty breathing, and an x-ray of the dog revealed two broken ribs and a punctured lung.

Sadly, these stories are not uncommon. Most of us have probably seen footage from the ASPCA or another humane association showing neglected and malnourished dogs, cats, horses and other animals. It is tragic when humans take the pets they should love and care for and instead turn them into objects of abuse and neglect. And it’s important to note that animals aren’t the only ones affected by such abuse; studies have shown a correlation in troubled individuals between animal abuse and other kinds of criminal violence.

As a responsible citizen, it is your duty to say something to authorities if you have substantial grounds for suspicion of animal cruelty. But it may be harder than you think to tell the difference between a neglected pet and one that’s part of a loving family. The Humane Society of the United States lists these key signs of animal neglect to be on the lookout for:

  • Does a pet owner have far more pets than they can properly care for?
  • Does a pet exhibit untreated wounds or obvious signs of a lack of veterinary care?
  • Does a pet have inadequate shelter during extreme heat or cold? (It is important to note that pets being kept outside does not necessarily imply cruelty. Many outdoor pets lead happy and healthy lives and are well-loved by their owners.)
  • Is a dog chained outside continuously?
  • Has a pet been left behind in a recently-abandoned home?

If you notice any of these signs or a combination of them, it is important to take action. In addition to calling 911, you can also contact a humane organization like the Humane Society of the United States or the ASPCA, which will be best equipped to deal with the situation. In most cases, an officer will be dispatched to investigate and file a citation if necessary. If the case is serious, you may be asked to testify in court.

Animal cruelty is best prevented by caring citizens who keep an eye out for their neighbors and their pets. Intervening to prevent animal cruelty not only benefits our furry, winged and scaly friends, but also helps their owners and society as a whole.

If an abandoned or neglected animal is placed in your care, bring it to CVA for a check-up. Our hospital in Valley Stream is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. For more information or to make an appointment, call 1 (888) 4CVA-PET (428-2738).

Cool Off at the Beach during These Dog Days of Summer

 

Family Walk

Many Long Island beaches allow pets in the off-season, between Labor Day and Memorial Day. But if you and your dog both want some respite from the heat, there are a few local beaches that are dog-friendly year-round! Here are our top picks:

  • Shadmoor State Park, Montauk: This outlier is a great destination if your canine loves car rides. Take a day trip to the East End and enjoy this park’s 2,400 feet of ocean beach! Dogs are allowed on a six-foot-long or shorter leash. And best of all, parking is free!
  • Gardiner County Park, Bay Shore: Not only does Gardiner County Park have a great dog-friendly park, but it doubles as a great bay beach location for your pet! According to the website BringFido, Gardiner is known for being “extremely dog-friendly,” and it is easy to see why. Amenities include plenty of on-leash trails, waste disposal stations and even a doggie water fountain. If your pet loves swimming, he or she can even paddle around in the Great South Bay!
  • Coindre Hall, Huntington:  This little-known park on Long Island’s North Shore is a popular destination for dog lovers. Dogs and their owners alike can enjoy romping on the spacious lawns adjoining the hall, a former Gold Coast mansion, as well as wandering down to the shore of Huntington Harbor.

As you enjoy the great outdoors with your dog, always remember to bring plenty of water for both of you, make sure your pet is protected by flea and tick medication and watch for signs of dehydration and heat exhaustion. As always, never leave your pet alone in a car.

If you have any questions or your pet has any health issues, don’t hesitate to call us at 1 (888) 4CVA-PET (428-2738). Our Valley Stream office is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.